Why You Might Be Grinding Your Teeth (And How to Stop!)

Do you ever wake up in the morning with a headache or a sore jaw? If so, you might be grinding your teeth at night. Teeth grinding, also known as bruxism, is a condition that affects millions of people worldwide. While occasional teeth grinding is nothing to worry about, chronic bruxism can lead to serious oral health problems. It might be time to look for a bruxism splint online. So, what causes bruxism? And how can you stop it? Keep reading to find out.

Why You Might Be Grinding Your Teeth (And How to Stop!)

Causes of bruxism

There are many different factors that can contribute to teeth grinding, including stress, anxiety, misaligned teeth, sleep disorders, and medications side effects. In some cases, bruxism may be genetically inherited. If you have family members who grind their teeth, you may be more likely to do so as well. 

Bruxism can occur at any age, but it's most common in children and adults between the ages of 20 and 40. Women are also more likely to suffer from bruxism than men. 

H2: Signs and symptoms of bruxism

If you think you might be grinding your teeth at night, look out for the following signs and symptoms:

  • Waking up with a headache or sore jaw 
  • Jaw muscle stiffness 
  • Earache 
  • Increased tooth sensitivity 
  • Worn tooth enamel - Broken or chipped teeth 
  • Fractured tooth fillings 

How to stop grinding your teeth

If you grind your teeth on a regular basis, it's important to see your dentist right away - they’ll be able to diagnose the problem and recommend the best course of treatment. In some cases, treatment may involve wearing a mouthguard (also called a splint) at night.

This appliance fits over your upper or lower teeth and protects them from grinding against each other. Physical therapy and stress management techniques may also be recommended.

Do you have bruxism?

Teeth grinding (bruxism) is a condition that affects millions of people worldwide. While occasional teeth grinding is nothing to worry about, chronic bruxism can lead to serious oral health problems like worn tooth enamel, broken or chipped teeth, and jaw muscle stiffness. 

If you think you might be suffering from bruxism, see your dentist right away for diagnosis and treatment options like wearing a mouthguard at night or physical therapy/stress management techniques.



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